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black ripper
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Tradicional costumes

on Mon Aug 12, 2013 5:03 am
[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] (着物?) is a Japanese traditional garment worn by men, women and children. The word "kimono", which literally means a "thing to wear" (ki "wear" and mono "thing"), has come to denote these full-length robes. The standard plural of the word kimono in English is kimonos, but the unmarked Japanese plural kimono is also sometimes used.
Kimono are T-shaped, straight-lined robes worn so that the hem falls to the ankle, with attached collars and long, wide sleeves. Kimono are wrapped around the body, always with the left side over the right (except when dressing the dead for burial.), and secured by a sash called an obi, which is tied at the back. Kimono are generally worn with traditional footwear (especially zōri or geta) and split-toe socks (tabi).
Today, kimono are most often worn by women, and on special occasions. Traditionally, unmarried women wore a style of kimono called furisode, with almost floor-length sleeves, on special occasions. A few older women and even fewer men still wear the kimono on a daily basis. Men wear the kimono most often at weddings, tea ceremonies, and other very special or very formal occasions. Professional sumo wrestlers are often seen in the kimono because they are required to wear traditional Japanese dress whenever appearing in public

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] (浴衣?) is a Japanese garment, a casual summer kimono usually made of cotton or synthetic fabric, and unlined. Yukata are worn by both men and women. Like other forms of traditional Japanese clothing, yukata are made with straight seams and wide sleeves. Men's yukata are distinguished by the shorter sleeve extension of approximately 10cm from the armpit seam, compared to the longer 20cm sleeve extension in women's yukata. Yukata literally means bath(ing) clothes, although their use is not limited to after-bath wear. Yukata are a common sight in Japan during the hot summer months (starting in July).

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] (振袖?, lit. swinging sleeves) is a style of kimono distinguishable by its long sleeves, which range in length from 85 centimeters for a kofurisode (小振袖) to 114 centimeters for an ōfurisode (大振袖). Furisode are the most formal style of kimono worn by unmarried women in Japan. The furisode is generally worn for formal social functions such as the tea ceremony or wedding ceremonies of relatives. Since furisodes can be quite expensive, many women rent them as needed rather than purchasing them.

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] (留袖?) is a type of kimono. It is an expensive formal dress worn by married women.
Originally, there was a custom that the long sleeves of the furisode were shortened after marriage, thereby creating a tomesode. This was because the long swinging sleeves would be impractical when the married woman worked in the kitchen. The word "tomesode" itself consists of two kanji meaning "to fasten" (留) and "sleeve" (袖)
Kuro-tomesode (black tomesode) are often worn for wedding ceremonies by married female relatives of the bride or groom. The eri, obijime and obiage are always white, and the obi matches the colourful pattern of the kimono to signify a happy occasion. It is believed that the black colour is to match the clean white colour of the bride, as this kimono is rarely used at other occasions than weddings of near family members (sisters or daughters). A friend of the bride or groom would not wear kurotomesode, but homongi or iro-tomesode.
At events at the imperial palace, it is strictly forbidden to wear kuro-tomesode, and here iro-tomesode is worn.

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] (十二単?) is an extremely elegant and highly complex kimono that was only worn by court-ladies in Japan. Literally translated, it means "twelve-layer robe". The older term, still used by scholars but not widely recognised in mainstream Japan, is Karaginu Mo (唐衣裳?). This is in reference to its Chinese coat (Karaginu) and apron-like train (Mo), the defining parts of the costume.

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] (袴?) are a type of traditional Japanese clothing. They were originally worn only by men, but today they are worn by both sexes. Hakama are tied at the waist and fall approximately to the ankles. Hakama are worn over a kimono (hakamashita).
There are two types of hakama, divided umanori (馬乗り?, literally horse-riding hakama) and undivided andon bakama (行灯袴?, lit., lantern hakama). The umanori type have divided legs, similar to trousers. Both these types appear similar. A "mountain" or "field" type of umanori hakama was traditionally worn by field or forest workers. They are looser in the waist and narrower in the leg.

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] (甚平?), alternately jinbē (甚兵衛?) or hippari (ひっぱり?), is a kind of traditional Japanese clothing worn by men, women, boys, girls, and even babies during the summer. Women's jinbei have started to become popular in recent years. Jinbei are usually worn as a form of nightwear or house wear. Normally, male Japanese would wear jinbei only within their own homes, or outside the home when in close proximity to it (for example, to collect the mail or go on a local errand, or sometimes even while shopping or dining at a local restaurant). Sometimes jinbei are used as substitute for yukata during a summer festival, typically by men and boys but also frequently by young women. Ladies' jinbei tend to be more brightly coloured and often feature prints of popular culture characters and motifs.

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] (作務衣) is the work clothing of Japanese Zen Buddhist monks, worn when engaged in samu. Made from cotton or linen and traditionally dyed brown or indigo to distinguish them from formal vestments, samue are worn by monks of most Japanese Buddhist traditions. performing labour duty such as temple maintenance and field work.

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] (上衣) is a kimono-like jacket worn in Japan. It is most familiar as the top half of a martial arts uniform.
The third element, the obi belt, ties closed the uwagi and holds up the zubon.
In some martial arts, the set is completed by a hakama which might be worn over or instead of the zubon.

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.](法被, 半被) is a traditional Japanese straight-sleeved coat usually made of indigo or brown cotton and imprinted with a distinctive mon (crest). They are usually worn only to festivals. Originally, these represented the crest of a family, as happi were worn by house servants. Later, the coats commonly began to display the crests of shops and organisations. Firefighters in the past also used to wear happi; the symbol on their backs referred to the group with which they were associated. In English, "happi" is most often translated as "happi coat" or "happy coat".

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